Sunday, July 31, 2005

Transilvanian Hunger (1)

[OVER FJELL OG GJENNOM TORNER]

OVER MOUNTAINS AND THROUGH THORNS

Over mountains and through thorns
Through the evil dark forest
Die like a warrior, head on a tree
Slice through flesh, needles deep into the skin

Beaks of ravens in blood will gorge
After the battle has held place
Armoured bodies in gruesome battle
Axes planted, souls suffered
Cold swords whom the skin open
Hair that smells freshly of blood

The Norse race must slaughter the other
When niggers pound too heavily on our door

4 Comments:

Blogger UBERSATAN said...

something i've been wondering for a long time. does the word "nigger" have less of an offensive meaning in europe? i don't want to write darkthrone off as racists just yet, even though their music is still awesome.

9:22 PM  
Blogger \/\/inter/\/ight said...

In Darkthrones' 1995 release of "Panzerfaust", Fenriz and Nocturno Culto clearly state in album booklet: "DARKTHRONE IS CERTAINLY NOT A NAZI-BAND NOR A POLITICAL BAND, THOSE OF YOU WHO STILL MIGHT THINK SO, YOU CAN LICK MOTHER MARY'S ASSHOLE IN ETERNITY." I see that this politically correct North America got you by the balls. If you are worried that Darkthrone are racists and have to write them off, what are you doing listening to black metal in the first place????

3:15 PM  
Blogger GX542S265X said...

Agreed with WinterNight. Also, apparently the term that is translated as "nigger" is a generic term for foreigners (with an undesirable connotation, of course) and it refers to arabs immigrating.

7:46 PM  
Blogger Avfolkningskuf said...

Swedish person here, and as the word exists in Swedish as well (blåmän), being an old norse term, I can speak with some authority.

It most definitely does not translate to "nigger".

The word literally means "blue men", which is the archaic old norse term for dark-skinned people, with Africa correspondingly being known as "Blueland" in those times. In addition, Blá (blue) at the time actually meant black, not blue. Another example of this meaning is king Harald Blåtand (Bluetooth) of Denmark, presumably known as such for having black teeth.

In other words, the meaning is exactly equivalent to "black men", and a general term for dark-skinned or black people. The word is used in a 1541 Swedish translation of the Bible, and there is also a block of streets in Stockholm still called "Blåmannen" ("the blue man").

The term has no inherent or traditional negative connotations, but could possibly be interpreted as such just by merit of being archaic and unfamiliar in a time and context where other neutral terms are established and commonly accepted.

9:17 AM  

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